Tag: student

Mocks Shouldn’t = Misery

I’ve set myself a mission for the next few weeks. Every morning, before I do anything else I’m responding to at least 5 cries for help from students on social media.

Student sat at laptop studyingWe’ve entered the festive season of mock exams and for many year 10s, 11s, and A Level students this has meant an increase in mental health problems. So many posts about feeling overwhelmed, scared, and much much worse cannot be ignored.

The majority of my responses are reminding them that the results are formative, so will help them revise better. It’s not a “fail”, it’s still a work in progress. These discussions have prompted me to create my Painlessly Planned Revision printable which I’ve linked to at the end of the post.

What are mocks for?

With the new A Levels being linear (the exams are at the emd of two years), and most GCSEs being at least 80% – 100% exam, most students won’t experience the exam hall until the real thing. Mock exams give students a taster for what it’s like, so when they sit the real exams the anxiety of where to sit & what to bring is gone.

They’re also a way to assess progress so far. By now, most (not all) of the syllabus will have been covered and many teachers will use mocks to pick up on trends of topics that need to be re-covered as a class. They also give students the opportunity to identify what to put into their revision plan later.

They are not:

  • A final grade
  • An end point
  • Going towards the real exam
  • Pointless
  • The end of the world

Can I fail my mocks?

On a technicality, yes. But! You’re not failing in a final sense. It’s not failure, but feedback.

Done well, your mocks should answer the following questions:

  • Am I on track for my target?
  • Are there topics I need to study?
  • Can I improve my technique?

Even if the grade written on the front of the moack exam paper isn’t what you were hoping for, it is an opportuinity to identify when you should work on over the next few months so it’s not the grade that arrives in the results letter.

 

How Am I Meant To Revise If We Haven’t Finished The Syllabus?

Desk with books and a hand holding a penIf you haven’t covered it in class, it most likely won’t be in your mock paper. Lots of students have fooled themselves into thinking that every school is given a set of mock papers that everybody sits. Some are even sharing these online.

Firstly, don’t be so daft to think that sharing exam papers won’t land you in a tonne of hot water. If that really is an exam board mock paper, you could end up in heaps of trouble. Everything you post online is tracable, even if you’re not using your real name. Just don’t risk it. Please.

Secondly, the vast majority of schools and colleges write their own mock papers, and will set them based on what you have covered so far.

The best advice I can give you is to plan your revision to cover all of the topics that you have been taught, and if you can’t remember just ask your teacher for a list of topics (you can make it easier on them by printing the topic list from your exam specification and asking them to highlight the topics that you haven’t covered yet).

 

Why is Revision So Stressful?

If you weren’t a bit worried about your exams there would probably be something wrong. Feeling a bit worried means that you care about the results. However, if the worry is affecting the way that you sleep or eat, or you have felt really low about them for some time, you ought to talk to someone about it.

I sat my GCSE mocks waaaaaay back in the 90s, and it was quite stressful then. But comparing them to the high stakes & volume of the GCSE tests now, we really did have it easy. If you happen to scroll past posts bemoaning how much easier you have it and that it’s just fuss over nothing, keep scrolling. Don’t take it personally – it’s very likely that they haven’t seen the changes to the exam papers of the past 10 years. Don’t feel that your stress in invalid, equally don’t feed it with poor study habits.

 

Ok, How Should I Revise Then?

If your mocks aren’t for a few weeks then you still have plenty of time to put together a plan. If not, well a condensed plan will have to do (some revision is still better than no revision). I’ve spent some time putting together my Painlessly Planned Revision printable which I’m sending out into the world completely free.

If you’re a student, please download it and keep reading that first page until you believe that we’ll be utterly proud of your best, no matter what that is (although you might want to fill in the rest too!).

If you’re a teacher, please feel free to download and print off copies for everyone. It’s not subject specific – in fact it’s designed to be a plan for all revision.

If you’re a parent or guardian, please download it and use the first few pages as prompts to talk to your child about how they feel going into revision, and as a springboard to being able to offer help (even if you’re a bit nervous about it).

 

You can access a free copy of the Painlessly Planned Revision printable here.

Painlessly Planned Revision

 

 

For more information about GCSE Computer Science, revision resources, online tutoring, online courses, and teacher CPD, visit www.TeachAllAboutIT.school

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